How To Use Bowling In Your RDI Program For Autism

How to use use bowling in your RDI program for autism. What is RDI? How does one use bowling in their RDI program for autism? Why would someone use bowling as an RDI activity?  

RDI is teaching a child with autism how to integrate the flow of information. Unlike ABA, it teaches a child how to take the information, process it correctly then take action using the information.  You take ordinary activities to scaffold to make a child successful. You keep this up until the child can do the activity pretty much on his own with no scaffolding.

We had been searching for an activity that would help fulfill our PE obligations for our homeschool. We also needed to find an activity that would work on Logan’s muscle tone but would not be too strenuous or make him sweat too much . He’s allergic to his own sweat so that was quite a feat for sunny Florida.. I have fond memories of bowling as a child with my favorite aunt and my grandmother so I decided to try it with the children. The added bonus of the Kids Bowl  Free  during the summer made it a natural choice.

If your child is extremely competitive , you may want to go with just the two of you.  A prior goal for us was to teach Logan that everything was not a competition as well as how to lose gracefully. This made it possible to bring Madison on our excursions. It also gave me a way to not necessarily partake of the bowling so I could concentrate on our RDI goals. I would strongly suggest to only bring one other child.  You need to be able to concentrate on the RDI goal not play referee. 
 How to use bowling in your rdi program for autism. Non verbal cues, productive uncertainty, & taking turns are all areas of weakness for people with autism.
Objective: To want to experience share the activity with someone else.  Logan will do this by referencing during the activity. Mom or Dad will acknowledge his reference using non verbal responses.
Activity : Bowling (first just with one person then we can add in his sister)
Scaffolding (as necessary):  Non verbal cues like clearing of throat, loud sighing or even a loud non descript noise if absolutely necessary.

Madison bowled pretty well considering  the ball weighed about 6lbs and she only weighed 46lbs. One week she even got a strike! Believe me, the whole bowling alley knew it.  She’s never been known for being quiet. It was a great way to show Logan how to be happy for others even when you are in competition with them. That’s the beauty of RDI. You work on goals naturally as you live life.  I could never have set up a scenario like the one that happened naturally when Madison got a strike. It wasn’t the goal we were working on but it was a great experience sharing moment for later use.

Sibling Bible Study

Logan took to it like a duck to water. He managed to do well at it although 2 games is really his limit. It’s important to know his limit and make every conceivable effort to honor it.  We ALWAYS want to end the activity with a positive memory. Oftentimes, he was more interested in what the tvs were doing above the lanes. I could usually refocus him with minimal effort. He didn’t like to watch where the ball was going so we needed to work on that before we could work on our actual goal.  

How to use bowling in your rdi program for autism. Non verbal cues, productive uncertainty, & taking turns are all areas of weakness for people with autism.

To work on watching the ball, we simply had to redirect him from the tv.  The tv above the lane plays an animation while waiting for the score to register.  I would watch the ball while he watched the screen.  He would look to me to experience share then see I was watching the ball.  After the ball hit the pins, I would look at him.  He learned after what seemed like forever to watch the pins with me then I would watch the tv with him. That’s the beauty of the child wanting to legitimately experience share with you.

It seemed to be working on his muscle tone a good bit. We noticed that when he ran he actually looked like he was running and not flopping like a fish out of water.  While I will not say this is entirely due to bowling, it is helping his core strength which is a major factor in running. It is just one facet to his home occupational therapy program.

I scaffolded by clapping and acknowledging him verbally during the game. When he had the hang of it, I stopped  so he looked to me for reference. I used a thumbs up or a facial expression to respond to him. When he was not paying attention to his turn, I wait until he notices  and DO NOT give him a verbal prompt.  If he still didn’t notice then I sigh or clear my throat to get his attention.  Regardless, I go non verbal with him in an effort to to get him to reference me.  

The beauty of RDI is that it naturally fits into your life.  We can work on this same skill in other areas as well. Playing a board game or cooking together are fantastic activities to work on the skill as well.  After a period of time, it becomes natural to both of you.  That’s when you start to see the best progress.

The post How To Use Bowling In Your RDI Program For Autism appeared first on Our Crazy Adventures In Autismland.

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Penny Rogers
Just a Florida homeschooling mom attempting to navigate autismland with my teenage son with autism and the rest of my goofy family. We love Jesus and live gluten free . One kid with celiac and one gluten free for his autism. We utilize the Charlotte Mason approach mixed with lots of field trips as well as jaunts to Walt Disney World. Just sharing my adventures to make you feel better about your family and maybe learn a thing or two that helps !
Penny Rogers

Penny Rogers

Just a Florida homeschooling mom attempting to navigate autismland with my teenage son with autism and the rest of my goofy family. We love Jesus and live gluten free . One kid with celiac and one gluten free for his autism. We utilize the Charlotte Mason approach mixed with lots of field trips as well as jaunts to Walt Disney World. Just sharing my adventures to make you feel better about your family and maybe learn a thing or two that helps !

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