Geez…. AGAIN?!?! Campaign to END the R-WORD!

SERIOUSLY?!?!?!

AGAIN?!?!

In less than a week, Ashton’s “cover” (if you will) of Brian Hull’s cover of “Let It Go” from Disney’s Frozen, got 2 comments using the R-WORD! ARGH!!

*seriously banging head on her computer*

Do people not realize how cruel sounding that word really is?! Can people not learn a little netiquette and use the old saying “if you’ve got nothing nice to say, then don’t say it all?!”

Just from doing a little YouTube digging, I’m going to assume that the two users who posted the mean comments on Ashton’s video are children, or at the very oldest, teenagers.

THAT DOES NOT MAKE IT ANY MORE RIGHT!!

Just because you are not an adult does not mean that you shouldn’t know better than to call people names or to say that things are rude and inconsiderate and degrading. Let me ask you a question (“general audience of my blog” you, not a specific person). Would you like it if YOU were called a “retard”, or that something you posted online was referred to as “retarded”? My guess is you would not, and it would, at the very least, hurt your feelings.

While you did not call ME specifically a retard or say that something I posted was retarded, you DID say those things in reference to my son. My amazing and handsome son whom has overcome many obstacles and challenges in his life. Many that you (*specific to the people who posted mean comments*) probably have no idea of, and I truly hope, you never will. He’s struggled to make friends. He’s struggled to fit into a world that is not meant for those differently-abled. Ashton faces struggles every day, learning to cope and live in a world that is oftentimes mean and cruel. We’ve been very fortunate that we’ve been able to surround him with love, attention and compassion. He’s surrounded by family AND friends who absolutely adore him. We’ve got a great “team” at school that makes sure Ashton is able to learn, grow, and mature right alongside his peers. We have great physicians who are always available to answer questions and help us figure out the next steps in our life.

You mean people who keep posting comments on Ashton’s video are just that, *mean*. But, while you hardly register a blip on our radar, I’ve made it my mission TO END THE R-WORD! Please, just stop. STOP using the word, in ANY fashion. It’s degrading, mean and quite honestly, very cruel. You may think “oh I’m just joking”, but to someone who may happen upon the comment (or in this case, the MOTHER of the child in said video), it hurts their feelings to see their child, one has struggled to fit in for most of his life, being called names. I realize you probably don’t care about my feelings, nor my son’s. I also realize that you (the specific people I’m referring to) will likely never see this post. But the next time you go to comment on something, whether it be on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Reddit, or any other social media site, stop and think … “Is this really a necessary comment? Is it constructive? Does it help the person in any way? Would I want someone to talk to, or about, me this way?” If the answer is no, than maybe you should leave well enough alone and move along. I’m not saying all comments need to be happy, flowery, positive comments all the time (I actually appreciate constructive criticism or comments that just merely say “I don’t like this”), but let’s not degrade others just to make ourselves feel better.

Once again, I’ll post a link to Ashton’s video, as I truly am very proud of it. He did a wonderful job, all things considering, and who knows, maybe he’ll have found another “thing” that’s interesting to him, singing. Aren’t we all a little happier with some music and song in our lives?

and here was Brian Hull’s response to Ashton’s video 🙂

Thank you for taking the time to read this post.

With utmost respect,
Jenn, Ashton’s Mom

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Jennifer McCormick
From a non-verbal, severely autistic two-year-old little boy to a happy-go-lucky, social, verbal and friend to everyone fifteen-year-old teenager. Add in the little brother who struggles with ADHD and we've got some craziness going on! The journey has been well-worth the ups and downs and the heartbreaks are all worth it when I see my sons overcome the "impossible" and defy all odds. I couldn't be more proud. Buckle up and enjoy the ride!
Jennifer McCormick

Jennifer McCormick

From a non-verbal, severely autistic two-year-old little boy to a happy-go-lucky, social, verbal and friend to everyone fifteen-year-old teenager. Add in the little brother who struggles with ADHD and we've got some craziness going on! The journey has been well-worth the ups and downs and the heartbreaks are all worth it when I see my sons overcome the "impossible" and defy all odds. I couldn't be more proud. Buckle up and enjoy the ride!

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