Former CDC head explains autism-vaccine link

In this 2008 video, the head of the CDC admits that people with genetic mitochondrial dysfunction can become autistic after vaccination. But she then dances around the subject, and we wonder whether we heard her right.

Funny thing, this mitochondrial dysfunction isn’t as rare as she wishes it were. The Yasko protocol uses genetic testing to identify people with genetic mitochondrial dysfunction, for one thing, and suggests supplements that provide missing inputs for the mitochondrial processes that aren’t working right. (Mitochondria are little energy factories in each cell.) A recent study concludes that autism spectrum disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction are linked.

(Guess what, this head of the CDC, Julie Gerberding, has left that job and is now president of vaccines at Merck.)

Take a look:

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Phyllis Wheeler

0 thoughts on “Former CDC head explains autism-vaccine link

  • December 7, 2012 at 12:14 pm
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    I admit I didn’t watch the video, because I knew it would annoy me.

    All studies finding a link between vaccination and autism have been retracted, however the idea still “lingers” and the media hypes it up. There is NO empirical evidence for the link – and if a study ever did find a link, you will also find a study explaining why their results are not accurate.

    Source: My Heath Psychology textbook. Published in 2012.

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  • December 6, 2012 at 6:34 pm
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    @TheBottomandBack@xanga – I loved your post, I literally lol’d at the park analogy.  It’s very true and apt.

    I have to take issue with this, however: “The truth is, no one knows what causes autism”

    No, we do know what causes autism.  It is genetic.  The “no one knows” line is spouted in all the fundraisers, so it’s been picked up by almost all aspects of the media, but the scientific literature leaves little room for doubt.  We still don’t know the exact MECHANISM, same as with most other genetic disabilities, but it is unambiguously genetic in nature. 

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  • December 6, 2012 at 12:19 pm
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    This video is full of misinformation.  It’s not 2% of all children who are born with a mitochondrial disease, it’s around 0.09%, to give a generous figure.  And they say that 20% of autism cases have this as a precursor, but why necessarily link the mitochondrial disorder to the *vaccines*?  Could it not be the case that the mitochondrial disorder is a precursor to autism?  In fact, isn’t that much more likely?  Yes.  This is seriously some misguided, misinformed, conspiracy theory bullshit.

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  • December 6, 2012 at 10:14 am
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      The public don’t pay attention to the chemicals we insert into their bodies until someone gets hurt, such as the deaths from tainted steroid in epidural pain blocks.  Asking better questions about the necessity of any vaccine or procedure will go a long way in deciding risk vs. benefit.

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  • December 6, 2012 at 6:39 am
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    Let me get this straight, you’re saying that a select group, a group so small the all mighty internet refuses to give out percentages (because those numbers can seem low but saying 4000 children each year may develop said disease seems high… until you look at the number of children in the US), *might* develop autism after taking *a* vaccine, we must all, as a group, stop taking them? That’s like saying a select group of people *might* sprain their ankle when walking in the park so we, as a society, should destroy all the parks and any activities that involve the use of our lower legs.

    SAVE THE ANKLES! Let’s start a movement right now! Don’t walk. Don’t jog. Don’t run. Call your insurance for a wheelchair so we can roll our torches to the local parks and destroy these villains!

    “This one time… I was jogging at night in a darkened park and I fell and sprained my ankle. It was my first sprained ankle in my entire life and I’m absolutely certain the park is to blame. I never ever went to that park again and I petitioned the city to have it destroyed.”

    Do my last two paragraphs sound ridiculous? Because they’re in the same vein as your post. 

    The truth is, no one knows what causes autism and society refuses to see the good traits of it. It could be genetic or it could be dietary. It was literally only a few years ago that it was realized juvenile diabetes, long thought to be genetic, was simply a matter of the same family eating the same bad food for generations. It could be environmental but then it what part of the environment is causing it? The jet fuel that leaked into the nation’s water supply? The clouds of smoke cars emit each year? The pesticides put on food so we can have more of it to fuel the juvenile diabetes crisis?

    Should we ban all of these?  Because while ceasing *all* vaccines *might* help a select few, cleaning up the air, water and food supply *will* help *everyone*.

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  • December 6, 2012 at 6:21 am
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    @PragmaX@xanga – That’s the secret of the anti-vaxxer conspiracy theory.  Vaccines are ALL bad.  Why?  Because all doctors are evil people who fly around in black helicopters.  These ideas are stated vaguely and irrationally because they are fundamentally vague and irrational ideas.  No vaccine has ever been found to be linked with autism, with one exception: the whole vaccines cause autism scare was initiated in England with a fraudulent study by Andrew Wakefield.  He claimed that the MMR vaccine was the cause.  Wakefield admitted to fabricating and deliberately misinterpreting data to serve his own conclusions.  Later studies disproved his conclusions and his contemporaries have totally disavowed him, including other doctors who participated in the study with him.  Since then the mercury lobby in the US has picked it up.  Nobody has ever even FAKED a study linking autism to the mercury in certain vaccines, but there are a handful of doctors administering dangerous drugs like chelation making an easy buck off of desperate parents, despite having had their licences to practice medicine revoked in several states.  Ironically, money is often the motive alleged for participating in the conspiracy, but in reality there is more money to be made off of fake autism cures.  This is directly because of the mystique and confusion around autism, which is generated both by fundraising organisations like Autism Speaks, and by individual quacks like Mark and David Geier or the people in the ABA lobby.

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  • December 6, 2012 at 1:10 am
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    Might I offer a suggestion.   Suppose it is true that Vaccines cause autism.  Surely you cannot mean every single vaccine causes autism.

    Every vaccine is of a different composition.   So when you say “vaccines”, people don’t take you seriously.

    It’s like saying “medicine” causes diabetes.
    Medicine can include, aspirin, band-aids, honey, cough drops, azithromycin, or even accupunture.

    So if you want to be taken seriously, look at

    whichvaccines

    .  Vaccines for what?   The vaccine for smallpox, was the cowpox virus.  So if you’re saying the smallpox vaccine causes autism, then you are really making the case that cowpox causes autism.

    Vaccines are so broad a category with chemical compositions so varied and different, that it just doesn’t make sense to categorically lump them all together and say they all collectively cause something.    

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  • December 5, 2012 at 4:13 pm
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    As soon as I saw the title, I knew exactly who wrote this.  Yawn.

    I wish you’d take your conspiracy theories elsewhere.  I was under the impression that this site was designed to support those dealing with autism.  You’ve contributed absolutely nothing to that.  You only serve to toss out crackpot ideas like they’re candy and hope we swallow it the same as you did.

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  • December 5, 2012 at 1:25 pm
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    I appreciate that you bring these issues up in a context that is not always kind to your view point.   It would be much easier for you to post on an anti-vaccine website and get loads of praise.   Every once in a while, I post comments on the anti-vaccine websites with something to the effect of “Maybe there are environmental influences other than vaccines out there.”  I get lots of angry hate-filled comments in return. 

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  • December 4, 2012 at 8:24 pm
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    Mitochondrial disease is nothing new. That is why there is the vaccine injury board began in the late 1970s. The only difference is that doctors and insurance companies have started diagnosing those who are injured by vaccine-mitochondrial disease as autistic rather than MR or brain damaged.

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  • December 4, 2012 at 6:08 pm
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    @J – LMAO, “starting”???

    @OP: “Admits”???  That’s even funnier.  Just by the way, your vaccine religion has just been disproven.  AGAIN.  Good luck finding your way back to reality.  You’ll need it. 

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  • December 4, 2012 at 5:28 pm
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    That does it.  I’m done with this site.  We’re officially starting to venture into “blog posts that read like conspiracy theories.”

    Reply

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