Vaccine safety: whom to believe?

We’re all getting very weary of distortions of the truth in the media these days, with the election and all. Maybe we’re all getting a little more skeptical of what we’re told.


And so it’s not too surprising to me to find out that a whooping cough-tetanus-diphtheria vaccine used for 10 years until 2011 had a little clause in its product insert informing those who bothered to read it that the vaccine might cause autism.  This FDA-approved vaccine listed not only autism but SIDS as a possible side effect of using the vaccine.  This product insert is apparently no longer available on the Internet, except from the guy who photographed it in 2005 and put it up at the link below.

The Tripedia vaccine was approved in 2001 as a thimerosal-free version of the TDaP vaccine. In 2005, after four years of use, its product insert was found on several official websites, containing the language about causing autism.  The vaccine is still approved, but was discontinued by the manufacturer in 2011.

“How many times have you heard a doctor or health worker hysterically say there is ZERO chance that vaccines cause autism?” asks Jeffrey John AufderHeide, author of this blog post about the ephemeral information in the product insert for Tripedia:  http://vactruth.com/2012/09/18/fda-vaccine-autism-sids/

 

 

 

Phyllis Wheeler

0 thoughts on “Vaccine safety: whom to believe?

  • October 31, 2012 at 7:12 pm
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    I’ll trust a scientist over a conspiracy theorist any day of the week.  

    Reply

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