The Immorality of Early Diagnosis with No Access to Treatment


Dr. Ami Klin, an academic with expertise in autism. For the first time in many months, I thought here’s a guy who really understands. The lecture is 22 minutes long, and well worth the time.


Dr. Klin discusses research which has resulted in the ability to identify autism
reliably at six months of age, prior to the age where behaviors characteristic of autism typically begin to appear. Where he garnered my respect was when he said that an early diagnosis is useless if parents do not have access to effective treatment for their children. This seems like an obvious point but it is often overlooked by many professionals and particularly policy makers.

We parents have been saying this for the last 20 years! Put simply, early diagnosis without access to treatment is immoral. Substitute autism with leukemia and everyone understands that a diagnosis without access to treatment is cruelty. Finally, we have an academic who makes it very clear that autism treatment and early diagnosis combine as a moral issue. When speaking about early diagnosis, Klin says, “But this [early diagnosis] would be immoral if we didn’t also have an infrastructure for intervention, for treatment.”

Thank you, Dr. Klin, for boldly speaking the obvious and advocating for access to necessary autism treatment. Hopefully, we will hear more from Dr. Klin in the future!

 

Sabrina Freeman, Ph.D. on Twitter
Sabrina Freeman, Ph.D.
Sociologist (Ph.D. Stanford '95), autism advocate, author of several books & a DVD on autism, mother of an adult w/ autism, founder of FEATBC in '96.
Sabrina Freeman, Ph.D.

Sabrina Freeman, Ph.D.

Sociologist (Ph.D. Stanford '95), autism advocate, author of several books & a DVD on autism, mother of an adult w/ autism, founder of FEATBC in '96.

0 thoughts on “The Immorality of Early Diagnosis with No Access to Treatment

  • December 19, 2011 at 1:33 pm
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    Let’s see: my son is 20… when he was two I attended a meeting re. the critical importance of early intervention (complete with videos of adults in full meltdown and injured direct-care workers), which ended with the presenter saying he wasnot taking any new cases. When my son was six intensiive intervention was ordered pursuant to a long court case. No on was able to provide it… and the on-again, off-again interventions we were able to secure made things worse.

    Yeah: “we have the cure for juvenile diabetes, but you can’t have it”  pretty much sums it up.

    Reply

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