“Send them away.”

When Dannie was six, I had organised a surprise party for her at our house, I thought I had done great, The house was all decorated, all her friends were invited and Dannie had went to a friends house straight from school so she had no idea what was going on at the house.

I purposefully didn’t put any decorations outside the house as I didn’t want to spoil the surprise. 

Around 4.30pm all her friends started to arrive, the food was all made and everything was set.  I had arranged for Dannie to come home around 4.45pm. At 4.50pm, Dannie knocked on the front door, I asked all the kids to keep quiet and proceeded to let Dannie in.

Dannie came through the door and all her friends shouted “Surprise, Happy Birthday,”  Dannie did no more than ran out of the house and hid in the neighbour hood.

It took three adults to go and find her, everyone else just stood, shocked and didn’t know where to turn.

20 minutes later myself a two other parents found Dannie hiding in the local playpark under the slide.

“Send them away.” was all Dannie kept saying.

I did finally manage to get Dannie home and once she had calmed down, she did enjoy her party but I can assure you I have never made the same mistake again.

Danniesdilemmas

0 thoughts on ““Send them away.”

  • August 26, 2010 at 10:54 pm
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    Why are we even arguing about what we’re being called when the original “offensive” statement said that we should just learn to handle surprises?  If the statement must be viewed as insensitive why focus on the smallest part of it?

    Reply
  • August 26, 2010 at 10:17 pm
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    @Nawnaa@xanga – Hence Partial Tard. It’s like when you’re sick. You’re partially dead, but illness is not at all the same as death.

    Ergo, yes, you are right. But since I am infallibly correct and unapologetically perfect in every way conceivable, I am also right.

    Reply
  • August 26, 2010 at 11:47 am
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    @ionekoa@xanga – Well, usually, that’s the message I get. However, as I mentioned, I was feeling a bit sensitive.

    At best, it was a lazy way of saying, “Persons with autism,” or, “Autistic.”

    🙂

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  • August 26, 2010 at 11:26 am
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    @heatherbabes – ahhh, see i’ve heard that kind of thing before but never really seen the issue. whether it’s “you people”, “these people”, or whatever i just see it as a descriptor, nothing more nothing less. in this specific case “these” a general reference refering to a previously specified description “people”… well, people. the same with the “you people” everyone get’s mad about. “you”, a pronoun indicating that the listener is the subject of the sentence, people, indicating that that subject is a group of humans.

    Reply
  • August 26, 2010 at 9:28 am
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    Wow, I feel sorry for her.  She is going to hate that memory.  I hate surprises too- even if I like the person, I like being warned in advance they will be there. 

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  • August 26, 2010 at 7:15 am
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    @ionekoa@xanga – I assumed that as well but was hoping I was wrong. I just was being sensitive I guess though. I don’t like being referred to as “these people.” And, since I have Asperger’s syndrome, I would have been one of “these people.” 

    Reply
  • August 25, 2010 at 9:09 am
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    This entry needs more context. Okay, so this happened. Why? It’s an interesting weblog entry, but it needs something more.

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  • August 25, 2010 at 8:34 am
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    These people usually hates surprises and prefer everything know in advance. But they need to be taught how to handle surprises.

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  • August 25, 2010 at 1:45 am
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    Surprise social occasions are something a lot of people find difficult. There’s quite a few shows on the tv that rely on that for the amusement of others.

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  • August 24, 2010 at 8:55 pm
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    Sounds like the shock of it embarrassed her. She doesn’t like being the center of attention. lol

    Reply

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