Autism and Vaccines – Here we go again.

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Stacie
I am Stacie a SAHM of three. I started blogging in May 2009. When I first started blogging I wanted to spread the news about autism awareness. I wanted a place where others could see inside my world and know what I go through on a day to day basis. Just giving a glimpse of understanding. I also wanted others who also had kids on the spectrum to not feel alone. Since then my blog has changed and I also started blogging out our adventures in homeschooling.
Stacie

Stacie

I am Stacie a SAHM of three. I started blogging in May 2009. When I first started blogging I wanted to spread the news about autism awareness. I wanted a place where others could see inside my world and know what I go through on a day to day basis. Just giving a glimpse of understanding. I also wanted others who also had kids on the spectrum to not feel alone. Since then my blog has changed and I also started blogging out our adventures in homeschooling.

0 thoughts on “Autism and Vaccines – Here we go again.

  • October 28, 2009 at 4:28 pm
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    Arguments are generally more effective when your grammar, syntax, diction, etc. sound correct.

    Reply
  • August 13, 2009 at 7:23 am
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    Autism caused by vaccines was started by Andrew Wakefield (Royal Free Hospital) in 1998 from a 12 children with behavioural problems (mostly autism) and gastrointestinal problems after MMR in 8 of the children. He analysed research data from papers before 1975. He concluded that individual vaccinations rather than a combination one were safer. At that time Wakefield was being paid £50,000 from the solicitor of families suing the manufacturers of MMR for causing autism and eventually received almost £500,000 plus expenses. He also failed to disclose to the Lancet (where all British medical papers are published) that he was involved in the patent of a new vaccine.  

    The General Medical Council is in the protracted process of disciplinary action against Wakefield for not only the now-discredited* conclusions of his research but also the incredibly invasive procedures he did to the little children.  The latest ref. in the media about the case  is http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article5913324.ece. Wakefield is also suing Brian Deer http://briandeer.com/ who was the investigative journalist at the Sunday Times who first raised doubts about MMR-autism connection. Deer’s site contains many links to papers, seminars etc. from the US and UK on MMR-autism. 

    There has been much autism research done on the MMR vaccine. In fact, its easier today than ever because enough people are not getting the kids vaccinated in numbers big enough to draw two closely-matched populations, one vaccinated and one not.

    I’m not suggesting everyone ignore their hunches (but do ignore the media unless it has the science, the research to back it up) and get their kids vaccinated when they feel strongly about it. But since the diseases mumps, measles and rubella vary from pretty mild – I had them all as a kid – before the vaccine to absolutely devastating, it is worth actually doing some research on PubMed first.  Where papers are peer-reviewed it is irrelevant who funded them ,big Pharma included.

    *Pubmed, the Lancet et al if you want to trace the research, probably it could be done through Google.

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  • August 12, 2009 at 9:07 pm
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    “Even the AMA wouldn’t future test autism and vaccines.”

    It would be unethical to take two groups and vaccinate one and not the other, observing who develops autism.  The only thing people can do in this situation is conduct correlational research.  And there definitely hasn’t been a strong enough correlation to suggest causation.

    Side note: it’s a little weird that, in your About Me, you mention that you have three children but then only describe two…

    Reply
  • August 12, 2009 at 12:00 am
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    //Well I am sure there is evidence that shows it does also but you see
    those big pharmaceutical companies have these fancy lawyers to keep us 
    believers away.//

    You need to demonstrate that the evidence is faulty rather than wasting time speculating in a vain attempt to justify your beliefs on vaccines and autism.

    Reply
  • August 11, 2009 at 11:56 pm
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    The scientific consensus is that vaccines do not in any way contribute to autism. I have never met a single epidemiologist, psychologist, or neurologist who disagrees with this position. VACCINES DO NOT CAUSE AUTISM. Vaccines do kill people (a very small number), but they save far more than they kill. But autism is completely uncorrelated with vaccination, implying that there is no causal connection whatsoever.

    We don’t know what causes autism; we do know it’s not vaccines. If you really want to understand autism, you will give it a rest about the vaccines.

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  • August 11, 2009 at 9:54 pm
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    I have a copy of the PDR and all that goes into vaccines, aluminum and  formaldehyde come to mind plus the potential side effects that parents aren’t told about are scary, .  Add to it the number of them that children under the age of 2 receive compared to what I received 30 years ago.  My children have received vaccines, but with my youngest, I did not get the rotavirus or the hep b.  The cause of autism is complex, I don’t presume to have any answers, but I would say that vaccines most definitely could contribute to the problem.

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  • August 11, 2009 at 8:59 pm
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    One way or the other, the point remains that vaccines are NOT, and I repeat, NOT 100% safe or effective either one. You should be cautious of doing ANYTHING that is not 100% safe or effective. 

    I was vaccinated. I can’t say as vaccines have ever done me any harm, but they probably haven’t done me a damn bit of good either. I will NOT be getting anymore vaccines, however (i.e. Tetanus and Flu). 

    Reply

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