A Real Look at DSM V

Lately the internet is a buzz with all sorts of chaos about the proposals for the new DSM (V) set for 2013. Petitions are flying, people are screaming and panicking…… STOP. Please stop. And please read this through so I can help you better understand. Your benefits, diagnosis, treatments, supports and what ever else are not being taken away. You are not going to lose your identity or anything else. Lets walk through it, shall we?

Primary complaint is that they are removing Asperger’s and Rhett’s syndrome from diagnosis in the DSM V. But hold on, that already happened. Yes, it already happened. DSM IV lists the new compound definition as Autistic Disorder. Read it HERE. Click on the tab that says DSM IV and read it. 

What does this mean? It means that you either have autism or you don’t, period. If you were diagnosed with Asperger’s, then you have autism. If you were diagnosed with Rhett’s, you have autism. It is not intended to take anyone’s diagnosis away. It doesn’t change your diagnosis except for the sake of a word.

Why did they do this? The biggest reason is that autism is already really hard to tie down in a category like when they had five forms listed before. It was hard to diagnose and still is. Having all the varied categories actually created more confusion than they were worth. Consider this:

Right now there are still several states where insurance will not cover treatments for “Asperger’s” but they will for “Autism“. Think about it. The new definition in the DSM means you are actually more likely to get the treatments and support you need because of insurance companies needs for specific terminologies.

Here is a quote from that same link under the tab of “rationale”:

Because autism is defined by a common set of behaviors, it is best represented as a single diagnostic category that is adapted to the individual’s clinical presentation by inclusion of clinical specifiers (e.g., severity, verbal abilities and others) and associated features (e.g., known genetic disorders, epilepsy, intellectual disability and others.) A single spectrum disorder is a better reflection of the state of knowledge about pathology and clinical presentation; previously, the criteria were equivalent to trying to “cleave meatloaf at the joints”.
Be sure to read the tab for the DSM V. You will notice that nowhere does it say that you are not autistic if you were previously diagnosed under one of the five previous forms of autism. All that is happening is a change of terminology, nothing else. 

Asperger’s and Rhett’s have not ceased to exist, they are simply consider as “Autism”. That is all. I hope that people can calm themselves soon and see this before they cause themselves a lot of unnecessary stress. 
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David Wilde
I am an advocate for autism now sharing my own fantasy universe to show just what people can do in spite of limitations (like my hands). I'm writing an ongoing story on my blogspot, have a facebook fanpage and more. I have one novel being considered by agents.
David Wilde

David Wilde

I am an advocate for autism now sharing my own fantasy universe to show just what people can do in spite of limitations (like my hands). I'm writing an ongoing story on my blogspot, have a facebook fanpage and more. I have one novel being considered by agents.

0 thoughts on “A Real Look at DSM V

  • April 25, 2012 at 12:09 pm
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    There is definitely so much that you can learn from this. You really have to do your homework on this. I hope to see mork work on this in the future. 

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  • February 5, 2012 at 12:03 am
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    Thank you! I’m currently researching the issue of the impending changes. Until recently, I’d been thinking that the changes would benefit my son, since we live in one of those states that recognizes autism, but not Asperger’s Syndrome, but the sudden flurry of concern regarding the possibility that he and others like him might no longer be considered to be on the autism spectrum was worrisome. I’m continuing my research, but it’s nice to be able to do so a with a bit more confidence.

    Reply
  • January 31, 2012 at 3:35 am
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    I think them changing it to all autism is actually a smart idea.  There are a lot of illnesses that have varying degrees, why shouldn’t autism, which I know is not an illness, but a condition, or, how do I word that?

    Reply

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