Small Change, Big Problem

We had a homework challenge last week. Annie came home with one page of homework, in place of the usual two or more pages. She completed the mathematics section at the top easily enough.

But then she refused to complete the second part of the homework. It took me ages to work out what the problem was. Two completely different tasks on the one page, such a small change, but it was huge for Annie. Next time I will know to check the homework sheets and cut them in half if necessary.

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What Homework Challenges have you had?

 

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Marita Beard
Life, the Universe and Autism
Marita Beard

stuffwiththing

Life, the Universe and Autism

0 thoughts on “Small Change, Big Problem

  • January 11, 2012 at 6:04 pm
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    No need to apologize. 🙂 I’m very glad that you were able to address this, and that the teacher has been supportive.

    Reply
  • December 9, 2011 at 3:36 pm
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    @icanhasautism – @Prism – Somehow I missed the comments here and for that I apologise. 

    Thank you both for your suggestions. I ended up raising the issue at our PSG meeting (kind of similar to an IEP meeting) and the teacher has sent separate sheets home since. 
    Now it is just a matter of me making sure to clue up next years teacher. 

    Reply
  • October 29, 2011 at 3:24 pm
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    I would do as you plan to do, separate the material if needed, and then make sure you attach a note to the homework to the teacher and explain to her about why you did it.

    Sometimes, whether a teacher wants to listen to a parent’s teaching advice, it’s the best in the long run.

    Good luck!

    Reply
  • October 12, 2011 at 8:46 pm
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    This sounds like something you could talk to Annie’s teacher about. It would be a small change for the teacher to separate the material before handing it out, and might benefit other children, as well. If you approach the teacher, I would recommend mentioning Annie’s difficulty and explaining your solution, but not actually suggesting she make the change, since many teachers resist parents’ “teaching advice.”

    Reply

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