Intensive Interaction

I don’t know how many pairs of socks C has gone through – hopefully we may have solved this…..

=

First had to get into C’s world to work out why pulling up his socks every few yards had become a repetitive movement. Not good when in crowds or crossing roads. What need did it meet for him? Delay tactic? Anxiety? Sensory? Etc… 

Anxiety? Using Intensive Interaction I tried pulling my socks up at the same time as C. When C does this he makes a very loud humming noise as he has to take his fingers out of his ears. So when I did it I made his happy sound a loud eeeek while looking at him reassuringly. It worked practically straight away. An amusing sight the pair of us bobbing up and down humming and eekkking. But I don’t care – if it helps C cope with his environment. And as I am focused on C I am not seeing the stares and judgements people are making, which I know happens anyway. Might even make some people think a bit differenlty??

But this didn’t seem to be enough so had to think of something more. Over the months C has been doing this I’ve tried different colour socks, seamless socks, trainer socks, expensive socks etc. Nothing made a difference and all socks would quickly end up falling down as with C’s impressive nails the elasticity doesn’t last long. It was suggested to put ‘wrist sweatbands’ over the top of C’s socks.

Worked a treat 🙂

Intensive Interaction isn’t just about mirroring but about feelings and motivations of what a person gets out of something. Connecting. Not just speaking their language but understanding it and responding.

Sensory? Deep pressure (from sweatbands – i did try them on my ankles first to make sure they wouldnt be be too tight)  – has a calming comforting soothing affect. Helping to decrease sensory input. C also enjoys brief deep massages – and really hard quick hugs. And he will wrap himself up tight in a quilt. Large beanbags and hammocks C also finds very calming. I’ve wondered about weighted blankets (but do be careful as one young boy died) and hug vests. The blanket cuddle swings look good as do the body socks

But for now sweat bands are helping.
Sweatbands may also be helpful for people who eat their cuffs – wish I had thought of that when C was younger!

Or maybe they work as they simply keep his socks up!    
Read original post

Jen Shrek on Twitter
Jen Shrek
Mum, advocate and #ActuallyAutistic challenging the system.
Jen Shrek

Jen Shrek

Mum, advocate and #ActuallyAutistic challenging the system.

0 thoughts on “Intensive Interaction

  • July 14, 2011 at 6:01 pm
    Permalink

    @Kyuketsuki_no_Megami@xanga –  actually if the tip of my finger touches a surface it hurts. The only way to stop this is to have my nails long enough that i don’t need to use the tips of my fingers at all. Just because you have worked with children that have autism doesn’t mean you understand everyone with autism. Your method would not work on me because you don’t have an open mind.

    Reply
  • July 14, 2011 at 12:25 pm
    Permalink

    @dagitzjames@healthkicker – So you choose to encourage irrational fears instead of help the people overcome them for their own health and safety? I’ve worked with autistic children before- the last thing most of them need are nails this incredibly long which is something I’ve never seen on any of them before. Whoever their parent is is clearly just using quirks as an excuse NOT to take care of their child because they can’t handle the fighting. The thing about kids, any kids, no matter their situation, is that if they don’t like something, sure they’ll fight it, but do it enough and the fight goes away. Or, you know, you can just encourage it like you’ve suggested and they’ll continue to cut themselves, cut others, and cut holes in objects like their clothes like this person here. There’s a difference between quirks caused by autism and someone just not liking getting their nails cut. I wasn’t too keen on it either, but you know what? My mother still commandeered my arm and cut them anyway for my own safety.

    Reply
  • July 14, 2011 at 12:09 pm
    Permalink

    @Kyuketsuki_no_Megami@xanga –  thats the whole thing about autism. they perceive everything differently, and are extremely sensitive to other stimuli. things like taking a shower or even different fabrics can be extremely painful to them. even though there are no nerves in your fingernail you can still feel your fingernails being cut because of vibrations. don’t try to analyze something you don’t understand, because it doesn’t matter what your perspective is, people with autism will still experience the world they way they do.

    Reply
  • July 14, 2011 at 12:58 am
    Permalink

    @itsyourdecision@xanga – You don’t have to cut down to the nub- that’s not how you cut nails. You trim. There are no nerves in your nails. If you’re experiencing any pain trimming them, it’s in your head and not real.

    Reply
  • July 12, 2011 at 7:16 pm
    Permalink

    Of course, the obligatory comment is that perhaps his socks have holes in them because of his nails. You might wanna cut that.

    Reply
  • July 11, 2011 at 8:01 pm
    Permalink

    This is brilliant. My son constantly pulls up his socks and tears the heels out.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.