An Autism Survivor

Autism Survivor

Yesterday, Brandon experienced yet another grand mal seizure.  This time, the paramedics needed to take him to the hospital to care for the cuts and scratches they found on his face, head and hands. Brandon remained at the hospital for over five hours waiting for someone to attend to his wounds.  When he was released, he rode the bus home.

Brandon has many limitations and struggles with everyday life, but he is a survivor.  People ask me if he has always been that way or if it is something new.  Brandon went into survivor mode when he began to live on his own, thirteen years ago.  Brandon has been learning life, one step at a time by living it.  I have learned over the years, how to teach Brandon the basic tools of survival for an adult with autism and special needs.

Several days a week I teach Brandon a new life lesson. When Brandon is experiencing confusion, indecision, and uncertainty, or he is upset we are able to talk about it over the phone to get him over the hurdles. Brandon knows that no matter what he tells me, that I am there for him. I make sure to speak with a positive tone and without being judgmental.

I have spent the last thirteen years helping Brandon to build his self-esteem, improve negative behaviors, and self- acceptance.  He is growing and changing in ways no one expected.  A solid foundation for our kids is a must.  In order to develop and grow, they need to know you are there for them, no matter what. They need to be treated with respect, dignity and most of all they must be accepted for who they are.

It is projected that in the next 15 years 500,000 autistic children will become adults.  How does a parent prepare a child with an autism spectrum disorder to become independent?

It is best to begin right now no matter what your child’s age and give him/her the foundation of trust, love and acceptance.  Sometimes this is much easier said than done and I am aware of that.  Start with baby steps and learn as much as you can about your child’s condition, while working on yourself to be the best you can be.

Brandon is an extremely complex individual with numerous limitations, which at one time were his weakness, but now they are his strengths.  No one knows better than a mom how to work best with their child. You have everything you need inside you. You must find the courage to forge ahead, no matter what comes you way.

I am in the process of making up a list of the life lessons I have taught Brandon, as I believe they are universal and can help other parents along the path.  I have created a new organization to help autistic adults to move towards independence with dignity and respect, and I will tell you more about that next time.

Thirty-seven years ago when my son, Brandon, was born, I had no one to talk to and now it is my time to give back to parents something I wished I had.  I am offering a free phone consultation to help get you started.

 

Amalia Starr on Twitter
Amalia Starr
Mother to an independent autistic adult son, Motivational Speaker, Author, and Founder of the Autism Independence Foundation. Book Amalia to speak, call 800-939-1046 or attend one of her conferences or training.
Amalia Starr

Amalia Starr

Mother to an independent autistic adult son, Motivational Speaker, Author, and Founder of the Autism Independence Foundation. Book Amalia to speak, call 800-939-1046 or attend one of her conferences or training.

0 thoughts on “An Autism Survivor

  • July 27, 2010 at 11:45 am
    Permalink

    Let yourself be open and life will be easier. A spoon of salt in a glass of water makes the water undrinkable. A spoon of salt in a lake is almost unnoticed.

    Reply
  • July 22, 2010 at 4:21 pm
    Permalink

    Brandon just had another seizure this morning. His neurologist said there is nothing he can do to help Brandon.  35% of people who has epilepsy cannot be helped my medication. It is not easy! Thank God he has a great attitude. Thank you for your ongoing support. You inspire me too. We seem to help each other. Thank you! @Springingtiger – 

    Reply
  • July 22, 2010 at 1:48 pm
    Permalink

    Hope Brandon is Ok. The two of you are a great inspiration to me. Coping with Aspergers is bad enough but epilepsy as well! I am so grateful I don’t have seizures, I don’t have his strength.

    Reply
  • July 21, 2010 at 8:35 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you Jane! It was great to meet you too. I will see you at the Autspot Picnic. It sounds like fun! @Jane – 

    Reply
  • July 21, 2010 at 8:27 pm
    Permalink

    I finally found the time to start your book! Lovin’ it! I’m sorry to hear about Brandon’s seizure. He’s tough as nails taking that bus home! Hope you are doing well it was fun meeting you at the lemonade stand!

    Reply
  • July 21, 2010 at 8:22 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you so much for your lovely comment. Please feel free to use whatever you want for your website. Thank you, I would love you to share my site on your website.  @myspeechtherapy – 

    Reply
  • July 21, 2010 at 5:10 pm
    Permalink

    What you are doing is wonderful. There are so many parents out there who have no idea where to start. You are offering them insight and comfort as well. Since you are a mother of an Autistic son, you know the hardships, and pains of raising an autistic child. But now, 37 years later you know the mistakes you made, and can help others not to make those same mistakes. I would love to share your site on our website. I write blogs on http://www.myspeechtherapycenter.com about communication wellness and awareness. I also release articles, news updates, new findings and research, and other related topics to the speech community. Feel free to visit our free parent resources as well! Thank you for all that you do, and keep up the good work with Brandon!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.