Welcome to Autisable.com!

Autism: 1 in 150 are diagnosed with autism every day – more than almost any other disorder or disease.

Parents and families have many places to go to obtain information about autism, but fewer places dedicated to helping them connect with each other and share their own personal stories.

We’ve launched this site with the hope of creating a supportive community where you can share your struggles and victories. And through this sharing, we hope to help spread awareness about the full range of autism spectrum disorders.

Thanks to Xanga.com and the Brain Fried Network, a portion of the revenue generated from Autisable will be donated to Autism Research.

So if you’re among the millions who are struggling with the puzzle of autism or if you’re just interested in learning more, please feel free to join today!

Thanks and welcome to Autisable!

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The Autisable Team
We are the Team that helps share everyone's journey with Autism. From Autisable News to Guest Posts... we're here for you.
The Autisable Team

The Autisable Team

We are the Team that helps share everyone's journey with Autism. From Autisable News to Guest Posts... we're here for you.

39 thoughts on “Welcome to Autisable.com!

  • May 11, 2009 at 10:38 pm
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    I’m glad this is available! For those who have autism, and for who work with individuals who have it. I’m excited to learn more and how to create LRE for those I work with.

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  • May 10, 2009 at 8:03 am
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    This is awesome πŸ™‚

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  • May 10, 2009 at 5:36 am
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    This is great. My younger brother has autism so I’ll be following this.

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  • May 9, 2009 at 7:49 pm
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    I think this is a great idea! Now people can read stuff ehre and be like, “OMG I can DEFINITELY relate!”

    πŸ™‚

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  • May 9, 2009 at 2:05 pm
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    @AubreyMcFate@xanga – @autisable – Response from the aspie, I’m cracking up because I did NOT get that, clueless at the word formation, and wondering what the heck.  Takes me awhile, also, to get jokes, because I see words the same way others might see ink blots (I don’t get those, either).  I can speed read and get technobabble in an eyeblink, but something like ‘autisable’ bounces around my brain for awhile like a cat playing with a catnip mouse, I say it over and over in my head and see it in different colors and font styles, take it apart like blocks and rebuild it, and ~meaning~ just doesn’t get through sometimes.  So, from the resident aspie, good word, I approve, and the fact that a sort of pun is folded into it makes it more fun to roll around my head.    And @AubreyMcFate@xanga – is right, too many equate autism with disability as opposed to something more appropriate, such as (in my case) social deficit, or sensory overload dysfunction.  There is much more to learn about autism, and I’m thrilled it’s finally being looked at.

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  • May 9, 2009 at 12:12 am
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    I have a step brother with autism; this site is a great idea! πŸ™‚

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  • May 8, 2009 at 9:47 pm
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    @zergall@xanga – No.  I grew up without vaccines, got the measles, and I have a cousin who got brain damage from measles, has been severely retarded ever since.  I can’t express enough that vaccines do NOT cause autism, which can be found in every country around the globe.  However, I can tell that illness processes make my autistic tendencies worse when I’m not feeling well, too much sensory overload.

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  • May 8, 2009 at 9:44 pm
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    @Joysofmotherhood@xanga – When I was 3 they still didn’t realize there was a spectrum.  So, how ‘deep in’ is your son, as in nonverbal vs. verbal, nonresponsive vs. some response to people and environment, etc.  I was more prone to want to be alone at that age, introduced as The Screamer, tons of difficulty with kindergarten and grade school, no one had a clue I’d wind up with a 32 on my ACT going into college without even trying.  =)  I yap a lot about stuff like that on my blog, tolerance in mental diversity kind of stuff, have a sociology degree and personally see austism more as a social deficit than a brain dysfunction.  Quick advice if you want it– just love him for who he is.  My mother didn’t.  Even though I didn’t respond to ‘being fixed’ back then, it’s been very painful coming awake to it as an adult.  Good luck, and great big hugs!  Wish I could go back in time and hug my mom and tell her everything was going to be ok.

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  • May 8, 2009 at 9:31 pm
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    This is a great thing!  My five year old nephew has autism, so I know something about it…but would be interested in knowing more.

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  • May 8, 2009 at 4:05 pm
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    I think your facts are slightly off

    it’s not 1 in 150 people diagnosed every day, it’s 1 in every 150 individuals will be diagnosed in their lifetime (source: autismspeaks.org). In saying that, this is a great idea for a site

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  • May 8, 2009 at 10:43 am
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    I’m just testing if we can post over here from our regular xangas.  πŸ™‚  Glad to be a part of this.  :))

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  • May 8, 2009 at 9:13 am
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    I heard that, more and more, autistic people want others to stop looking at their disorder as a problem. Β Much like deaf people, they have developed their own unique community, and no one can quite understand what it’s like to be them unless you’ve been in their shoes.

    -shrug-

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  • May 8, 2009 at 2:04 am
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    This is fabulous. One of my friends has an autistic brother and I’ve seen it can be a struggle. I think this website is a great idea =]

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  • May 7, 2009 at 10:58 pm
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    @bluejacky@xanga – very cool…look forward to reading your stuff here.

    @Joysofmotherhood@xanga – glad you like.  feel free to share your stories as your going through them and submit them.  As we grow, people who have experience some of the same things may shine some light and their experiences may help you.  πŸ™‚

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  • May 7, 2009 at 10:30 pm
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    thanks for the group! my son who will be three in july was recently diagnosed with autism and sites like this help πŸ™‚ thanks

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  • May 7, 2009 at 10:02 pm
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    Glad to see a new group. More opportunity to learn things and hear stories.

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  • May 7, 2009 at 5:14 pm
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    Uh… this thing doesn’t work. I can’t read more than half a post… when I click on “more here” it takes me back to the front page and what I was reading disappears… am I doing something wrong? Other than that, this site is a good idea…

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  • May 7, 2009 at 4:04 pm
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    @jackyblue – Nevermind, I musta found a bug, was trying to log in under a xanga user name to this dotcom, I’m sure it’ll become part of the drop down menu, right?  =P

    @edlives@xanga – Hopefully by people WITH autism…

    Everyone is saying wonderful and great and nothing else…  I’ve been posting about autism on xanga for a YEAR and it’s hardly gotten notice.  It’s seriously about time we got a forum going.  Now, how about making special forums about all those other pesky problems in life…

    You guys may regret giving me my own special forum…

    @edlives@xanga –  Don’t worry, already well grounded and ready to rock.  I LIKE xanga, but might throw a little code on my new blog here so I’ll look the same.

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  • May 7, 2009 at 3:59 pm
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    @jackyblue – site just launched today.  What’s your Xanga blog?  maybe we could ask Xangateam to switch you over to Autisable from Xanga?

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  • May 7, 2009 at 3:51 pm
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    Why can I not get to this through my xanga blog?  I have Asperger’s, I have a blog there, I’d like to be able to link straight through.  I’ll be keeping an eye on this site.

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